Stinson's Liquor Store


Image of site from William St. Image from Google Maps, Oct 2020.

See larger version

Image of site from William St. Image from Google Maps, Oct 2020.

See larger version

Image of site from Mark St. Image from Google Maps, Oct 2020.

See larger version

Image of Stinson in newspaper (pt 1). Buffalo Evening News, Dec 11, 1959.

See larger version

Article about Stinson (pt 2). Buffalo Evening News, Dec 11, 1959.

See larger version

Stinson speaks on demolitions. Buffalo Evening News, April 17, 1962.

See larger version

Stinson steps down from position. Jamestown Post-Journal, Feb 8, 1965.

See larger version

Known Name(s)

Stinson's Liquor Store

Address

134 William Street Buffalo, NY

Establishment Type(s)

Liquor Store

Physical Status

Extant

Description

No record of how the building appeared in the 1960s has been located, but the current structure at this location matches the style of the period and is laid out as a typical liquor store.  The building is one-story, with concrete block walls and a hipped roof. The fa├žade is of a different material than the other walls. It has an inset front door with windows on either side composed of a large fixed-pane center panel surrounded by glass blocks. The roof has asphalt shingles, and there is a chimney about halfway back the right side of the building.

 

Detailed History

Prior to 1962, a "Stenson’s" Liquor Store was listed in the Green Book across the street from Stinson’s at 133 William St. This was likely an error in the Green Book, as the 133 William St. address appears correct, and William Stinson Jr. was the proprietor of the 133 William St. liquor store. Stinson Jr. was an influential figure in the community. Originally from Elba, Alabama, Stinson served in the US Navy during World War II. Stinson opened Stinson’s Liquor Store around 1946. In 1959, he was appointed to the Buffalo Municipal Housing Authority. In 1962, he contributed to an article in the Criterion, criticizing the city’s redevelopment plans for the Ellicott district. Stinson held his position at the Municipal Housing Authority until 1965. Stinson remained active in various political groups after stepping down from his position, and eventually moved back to Elba after he retired. Today, the building is home to the Citizens Community Development Corporation, a non-profit that provides social services to the people of Buffalo.

 

Related Issues